Speculative fiction and related works eligible for Nebula and Hugo awards in 2021

Yes, it’s that time again.

Many of the Sci Fi, Fantasy and Horror writers you and I know and read are posting about the stories and nonfiction (SFF-related) pieces they’ve published that are eligible to be considered for nomination to Nebula and Hugo annual award lists.

Well, I’m no different.

Here are my pieces that are eligible for nomination. If you haven’t read them yet, please hit the links and do so now. If you like them, please consider nominating one or two (or three). πŸ˜‰


Story: Las Girlfriends Guide to Subversive Eating

Eligible category: Short Story

Publication: Apex Magazine, March 2021

Las Girlfriends is an interactive story, to be read and play with entirely online. It was fun to create, and (I think) fun to read. Set up as if it were a website, you can jump from section to section in whatever order you want. The narrative voice moves between English and Spanish with ease and sass, and the eateries toured while fictional, are grounded in real Philly magic and grit. Bonus: the story has a playlist for you to listen to as you explore.

Interactive stories don’t usually get the love that those printed in digital or analog magazines get, and they often slip the attention of reviewers and “best of” compilers. But they represent changing thinking about how we can tell stories, and the forms by which we do so. I’ve always liked playing with and across forms, and this story is one of the results of that. (For a more conventionally rendered story of mine that nevertheless plays across forms, read “El Cantar of Rising Sun” at Uncanny magazine.)

Apex Magazine took a real risk by publishing this (the print edition of the magazine simply had a link to the online story) and I’d love to see them get some sort of acknowledgment for their daring.

And, did I say the story is fun?

Story: Saint Simon of 9th and Oblivion

Eligible category: Novelette

Publication: Speculative Fiction for Dreamers: A Latinx Anthology, September, 2021

My fiction likes to defy genre borders and walls.

Saint Simon of 9th and Oblivion” is a good example of that. Set in 1890s Philadelphia, it unites elements of urban (albeit historical) fantasy and steampunkish sci fi in an immigrant coming of age story. Race, identity, social constructs and conventions all inform this story which is ostensibly about a young Latina’s interaction with a being who may be a supernatural religious figure, a time-traveler or genuinely an alien. But at it’s heart it a story about family β€” of origin or of choice β€” and the expectations, inequities and manifold expressions of love that undergird familial relationships.

Although I’ve linked you here to a pdf of my story specifically, I can’t emphasize enough how great this anthology is, and the excellence of the stories contained within it. Please consider nominating other stories from this anthology as well, and please nominate the anthology itself!

Essay: So, you think your publication is working to advance equity in SFF?

Publication: SFWA Blog, September 2021

So, unlike the other two eligible pieces, I’m not sure if this qualifies for the category, or if in fact the SFWA blog itself would be what you should nominate. That would be great by me since the blog is filled with some really good essays on matters that are important to our sector.

The thing is, even if my essay isn’t individually eligible, you should definitely read it if you haven’t already. SFF publications need to look beyond mere diversity and inclusion efforts if they are serious about advancing equity. This essay looks at a number of internal and submission practices that in actuality shore up the status quo and actively disadvantage those who are outside of the existing power structure.


That’s it for now. Please read as many of your favorite writers’ eligibility posts as you can, read their work and then nominate them and vote for them (if you are eligible).

You’d be surprised how much of a boost it is for an author to be reminded that their work is both read and appreciated β€” and this is a handy way to do that.

Happy reading!

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