Hold the Door, Broken Earth & Latinx SFF at Arisia

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I will be on three panels at the upcoming Arisia convention (Jan. 13-16 at the Boston Westin Waterfront Hotel), all of them on Saturday, Jan. 14:

11:30 a.m.

Hold the Door: Game of Thrones Season 6 and More

Media, Panel – 1hr 15min – Douglas (3W)

Game of Thrones continues to move the plot well past the novels, and continues to introduce and kill characters in ways that are surprising and occasionally heartbreaking. We’ll discuss the ever-complicated handling of the show’s core female characters (and the pivot in handling most of them compared to Season 5), the rushed Dorn plotline, the deaths of characters we’ve loved and hated from day one, and more.

Santiago Rivas (m), Jeanne Cavelos, Genevieve Leonard, Mark W. Richards, Sabrina Vourvoulias

4 p.m.

Broken Earth: Writing SF from Societal Trauma 

Literature, Panel – 1hr 15min – Marina 1 (2E)

Authors create memorable works from personal trauma, but the political is also personal. N. K. Jemisin has been quoted as saying that her series The Broken Earth stems from her own processing of systematic racism in America through the lens of the Black Lives Matter movement. We’ll discuss The Broken Earth and other works that come forth when societal trauma enters the author’s sphere and how awful truth inspires fiction.

Andrea Hairston (m), Steve E Popkes, Kiini Ibura Salaam, Sabrina Vourvoulias

7 p.m.

Latinx SFF 

Literature, Panel – 1hr 15min – Marina 4 (2E)

The recently released Latin@ Rising anthology has raised the profile of stories from Latinx authors writing in English. We’ll talk about the anthology and other works, new and old, of SFF from Latinx authors. What perspectives and themes are important to these stories and their authors, and how do they explore the speculative world?

Julia Rios (m), Mark Oshiro, Dianna Sanchez, Sabrina Vourvoulias

Awards eligibility 2016

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Read the story

So this is the time of year many SFF writers compose posts outlining what short stories (etc.) are eligible for nomination for awards. While more prolific writers than me usually have a long list for you to choose from, most years I only have two or three pieces you might consider. This year it is only one:

El Cantar of Rising Sun, which was published in Uncanny Magazine, issue 11, July/August 2016.

It is an unusual piece —a riff on epic narrative poems that follow the protagonist’s trajectory from birth to death with countless journeys and battles between … Only this epic takes place on Philly streets in 2014, and  at its heart is a very distinct set of journeys and battles.

A fast-moving, dizzying, tragic tale with magic tattoos, rhymes, love, friendship, and death. The language is powerfully alive, swaggering and moving to its own rhythm and its own beat. Original and skillfully crafted.

— from Maria Haskins’ monthly short fiction round-up.

If you believe it is worth nominating, El Cantar of Rising Sun is eligible in the short-story category for  Nebula, Hugo and Pushcart awards.

 

On the Day of the Dead, join me for a reading at Brooklyn Commons

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The NY Review of SF Readings
presents our first
Margot Adler Memorial Reading
with
Terence Taylor (guest curator)
Sabrina Vourvoulias

WHEN:
Tuesday, Nov. 1st
Doors open at 6:30 — event begins at 7

WHERE:
The Brooklyn Commons Cafe
388 Atlantic Avenue (between Hoyt & Bond St.)

Per NYRSF:

November 1st is All Soul’s Day, and an appropriate date to conjure up the first of a pop-up sub-series within the NYRSF Readings: the Margot Adler Memorial Readings.

Before her passing two years ago, Margot had been a speaker and guest host at a number of our readings, particularly if they involved one of her more recently acquired passions, vampire stories. Her interests ranged far and wide, and any of these diverse interests will be the subject(s) of these readings. They might be journalism (she was a producer/host for Pacifica Radio and NPR), Wicca (she was author of Drawing Down the Moon, a book which introduced hundreds of thousands of Americans to neo-Paganism), psychology (she was granddaughter of the eminent psychotherapist Alfred Adler), vampires (she was author of Vampires Are Us: Understanding Our Love Affair with the Immortal Dark Side), or anything sf/f (she was a Clarion graduate).

For the inaugural edition of the sub-series, we’re most happy to present two other friends of the NYRSF Readings, a journalist/spec fic writer, and a producer/vampire and spec-fic writer.

Sabrina Vourvoulias is the author of Ink (Crossed Genres, 2012), a novel that draws on her memories of Guatemala’s armed internal conflict, and of the Latinx experience in the United States. Her stories have appeared at Uncanny magazine, Tor.com, Strange Horizons, Crossed Genres, and in a number of anthologies, including Latino/a Rising, upcoming in 2017. She is an op-ed columnist at Philadelphia Magazine, City and State PA and The Guardian U.S., and is the Project Editor for the Philadelphia Reporting Collaborative on Prison Reentry. Find Sabrina on the Web at sabrinavourvoulias.com or on Twitter @followthelede.

Terence Taylor is an award-winning children’s television writer whose work has appeared on PBS, Nickelodeon, and Disney, among many other markets. After years of comforting tiny tots with TV, he turned to scaring their parents. Terence is also author of the first two books of his Vampire Testaments trilogy, Bite Marks (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2009), and Blood Pressure (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2010) and has returned to work on the conclusion of his trilogy, Past Life.

Find Terence on the Web at terencetaylor.com, Twitter @vamptestaments, or walking his neighbor’s black Labrador mix along the banks of the Gowanus Canal and surrounding environs.
The New York Review of Science Fiction Reading Series provides performances from some of the best writers in science fiction, fantasy, speculative fiction, etc. The series usually takes place the first Tuesday of every month, but maintains flexibility in time and space, so be sure to stay in touch through the mailing list, the Web, and Facebook.
The Cafe has excellent food, a coffee bar, beer and wine. The Jenna freebie table will offer books and goodies, as will the raffle for any who donate.

After the event, please join us as we treat our readers for dinner and drinks at the cafe.

Jim Freund is Producer and Executive Curator of The New York Review of Science Fiction Readings. He has been involved in producing radio programs of and about literary sf/f since 1967. His long-running live radio program, Hour of the Wolf, broadcasts and streams (most) every Wednesday night/Thursday morning from 1:30-3:00 AM. Programs are available by stream for two months after broadcast. An audiobook collection of 15 hours of his interviews, Chatting Science Fiction, is now available for download at iTunes and Audible.com, as well as a 13-CD set from Amazon.com and Downpour.com. In addition, Jim is Podcast Host and Post-Production Editor for the twice-consecutive Hugo Award-winning Lightspeed Magazine.

The Brooklyn Commons Cafe at 388 Atlantic Avenue is an open and collaborative movement building space, only minutes away from the Hoyt-Schermerhorn and Atlantic Avenue subway stops in downtown Brooklyn. The Commons provides resources to the progressive community including affordable office and meeting spaces as well as an event venue that can host anything from parties and benefits to forums, performances, films and workshops. If you are interested in meeting or event space, please contact them at info@thecommonsbrooklyn.org.
LINKS:
http://hourwolf.com/nyrsf
https://www.facebook.com/groups/NYRSF.Readings

Readercon 27: Confronting the fails

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Reading “El Cantar of Rising Sun” on Saturday at Readercon. What a great audience I had! Thanks to each and every one of you who attended.

Readercon 27 just ended and I am trying to convince myself not to write this.

Here’s the thing, I love Readercon. My first year (Readercon 22) was a bit rough since I knew no one IRL (and precious few folks virtually), but it had enough substance and just enough fluff to hook me into returning every year (except last year, which I couldn’t swing for a variety of boring, mundane reasons).

The con has evolved a lot in those six years. It had a fairly major harassment fail that prompted it to revamp its safety policies and procedures so wholly it has become a model for other cons. The panels steadily grew more inclusive, and some even focused entirely on underrepresented groups (in  2014, the Thursday open programming track included a Latinx SFF panel, for example). Last year — in a welcome admission that even the intellectually predisposed need moments of bodily abandon — a dance party was added to the mix.

All of which is to say, that this year should have been great. And, in some ways it was. I spent time with a lot of wonderful people. The audience for my solo reading was fantastically supportive and appreciative. The new venue had better food, more lobby space and offered free wifi in private as well as public spaces.

But in ways that really matter to me, Readercon 27 wasn’t great at all.

There were more all-white panels than I remember from previous years. Microaggressions toward people of color became macro and played out in front of rooms full of people, and for the first time in my Readercon experience I came away from panels shaking my head at the stunningly unrepentant arrogance of members of the SFF community.

Others can speak to the panels they attended or were part of (the Readercon twitter timeline is full of incisive comment — I particularly suggest @ANerdCalledRage), I will stick to the worst of the ones I myself witnessed and have since been stewing about.

Beyond Strong Female Characters

This was a complete shitshow. Sorry, but there is no other way to describe it.

Within seconds of starting, the leader of the panel, Ellen  Kushner, silenced Mikki Kendall (the one Black panelist) as she was speaking about the trope of the Strong Black Woman.

When Kendall gave pop culture examples of the Strong Black Woman trope, Kushner demanded literary ones in a move that was 50 percent gaslighting and 100 percent intellectual hubris.

Instead of actually grappling fully and honestly with the trope, Kushner asked for a show of hands from the audience from those who had heard of the Strong Black Woman trope and those who had read N.K. Jemisin, and seeing many hands, dismissed the need to speak further about it, or the way a Black American author has addressed it in her work.

“Well, that was graduate level comment,” Kushner said to Kendall at one point, in a comment so wincingly condescending it hurt me, as an audience member, just to hear it come out of her mouth.

Kushner is someone who, at my first Readercon, held a reading so spectacularly wonderful it still lives vividly in my memory. I’ve always liked her work; I’ve always admired her talent. But … but … I will never be able to unhear this comment and the disgraceful stereotype it plays to.

Because of Kushner’s antipathy toward Kendall, the other panel members — Delia Sherman (Kushner’s wife), Kat Howard and Natalie Luhrs (all white-appearing folks) — got a lot more time to address the topic at hand than Kendall did. At the end there was time for only a few audience questions. Thankfully, Readercon’s Emily Wagner directed her question to Kendall, and so gave her some time to speak without constraint … but it was way too little and way too late.

The panel was real time proof that the online discussion of white feminism’s exclusion and dismissal of the concerns of women of color, particularly Black women, is sadly on point.

Blue Collar SF

I don’t actually know the name of the leader of this panel but not too long into the panel, the words “too many chiefs, not enough ‘injuns’” came unabashedly out of his mouth. My friends Ezzy Guerrero Languzzi (a Mexican-American writer who has been attending Readercon for the past five years) and Kay Holt (one of the publishers of Crossed Genres) got up and left right then. I’m sure others did too.

I did not, I stayed — because it’s hard to look away from an accident, and also because I am eternally hopeful that clueless leaders will experience a corrective from their co-panelists (all of them, at this panel, white-appearing).

After some time of bemoaning the lack of blue collar protagonists (the leader listed some five or six books he remembered with blue collar protags, and Bud Sparhawk spoke about his own blue collar characters) I thought we were finally going to broach the complexities of depicting blue collar protagonists of color when Marissa Lingen brought up intersectionality.

But I ended up feeling both disappointed and let down by the partiality of her plea to remember women are blue collar workers too.

Fran Wilde did mention a writer of color — Nisi Shawl and her steampunk novel Everfair (which will launch in September) — but as in the previously described panel, it was too little and too late.

Oh, and again, the leader of this panel made the point that books, not media or pop culture, were the acceptable references and subjects for analysis at Readercon. I’m not sure why this point was being made over and over again by leaders of panels this year in a way I don’t remember from previous years — is it about “making Readercon great again”? (Yes, that is a very intentional choice of words.) But, no matter its intent, it really sticks in my craw, as all such “purist” pleas do.

The panels I was on

Two of the panels I was on, Cozy Dystopia (about Harry Potter’s dystopian elements) and Fantastical Dystopia were inexplicably programmed one right after the other. They were pretty white (I’m a white-appearing Latina), which I think is bizarre given the ongoing discussion about erasure of people of color from post-apocalyptic worlds and dystopian literary constructs.

Cozy Dystopia was a great panel, thanks in part to Kenneth Schneyer’s leadership and his willingness to broach every we issue raised, no matter how fractious or complicated.

Fantastical Dystopia, on the other hand, was really quite awful. I took on the role of leader the day before, and consequently hadn’t organized it — and it showed. I truly value everyone’s contributions under less than optimal conditions, but things never meshed for us. On the other hand, at least nothing “outright barbarous” (to, fittingly, quote George Orwell) was said or enacted by any panelist — which reportedly happened at other panels on dystopia and apocalyptic fiction.

The third panel I was on — Who Gets to Tell My Story? — was terrific. The panelists were, without exception, great and it ended up being led by Julia Starkey, because Mikki Kendall (the scheduled leader) thought she was going to be late. Kendall actually arrived just as the panel started, and the session was lively and dynamic. This was the Readercon I remembered and loved so much.

I don’t know for a fact if the panel composition was less diverse this year, but it sure seemed that way to me, and much of what happened during panels felt like a huge step backward because of it. The tweets I’ve seen about The Apocalypse Is Already Here; It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed and other panels I did not attend, seem to confirm that others felt that way too.

Where to go from here

Because I love Readercon, I hope the folks in charge find a way to look at what failed this year and why, and to understand what it might have meant to the first-time attendee of color in the audience.

I think this deserves as much thoughtful discussion as what took place during the harassment situation from years ago. I’m thinking that in-depth conversations with Mikki Kendall and Vandana Singh (if they are willing)  and other folks who might have been subjected to public macro- and microaggressions are in order before next year’s planning begins.

Also, attendees of color should be invited to give their suggestions and recommendations to ensure that Readercon doesn’t garner — further? — a reputation as an unfriendly con for PoCs to attend.

There is an opportunity here for Readercon leaders to do better and to confront the damage done this year head-on. To paraphrase Dolores Huerta and conflate several of my favorite quotes from her: Every minute is a chance to change the world …now get off the sidewalk and march into history.

Updated 7/12/16 at 4:34: The leader of the Blue Collar SF panel was Allen Steele, per the comment on this post by one of his co-panelists.

Updated 7/11/16 at 2:38 p.m. to correct title of panel about which I’ve seen tweeted complaints. 

My Readercon schedule

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From July 7 through the 10, I’ll be in Quincy, Mass. at Readercon. For those of you who haven’t heard about it, here’s a description:

Although Readercon is modeled on “science fiction conventions,” there is no art show, no costumes, no gaming, and almost no media. Instead, Readercon features a near-total focus on the written word. In many years the list of Readercon guests rivals or surpasses that of the Worldcon in quality. Readercon is the only small convention regularly attended by such giants of imaginative literature as Gene Wolfe, Samuel R. Delany, John Crowley, Barry N. Malzberg, Kit Reed, and Jonathan Lethem. The program consists of two tracks each of panel discussions, author readings, and solo talks or discussion groups, plus kaffeeklatsches (intimate gatherings with an author) and autograph signings. The program also currently features the presentation of two major genre awards: The Cordwainer Smith Rediscovery Award for a neglected author and the Shirley Jackson Awards for dark fantasy and psychological suspense.

This year’s Guests of Honor are Catherynne M. Valente and Tim Powers; the memorial Guest of Honor is Diana Wynne Jones. I’m slated to be on three panels, and I’ll be giving one reading. If you are at Readercon, please stop in and say hello.

Friday, July 8, 2 PM:

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Cozy Dystopia

Gili Bar-Hillel, Bart Leib, Shariann Lewitt, Kenneth Schneyer (leader), Sabrina Vourvoulias.

When we think of the world of Harry Potter, what comes to mind first—the magic and childish delights of Hogwarts, with its cozy dormitories and feasts and flying lessons, or its numerous, creeping dystopian elements (even discounting Voldemort!), from the enslaved house elves to Umbridge to the Dementors, which are, frankly, the tools of a fascist state? Can we make an argument that HP is actually more like a dystopia than a fantasy? Even if we’re half joking, there’s still an interesting discussion here: how do these two sides of the wizarding world play off each other, and how do they compare with other dystopian YA? Maybe we need a new subgenre: Cozy Dystopia.

Friday, July 8, 3 PM:

Fantastical Dystopia

Victoria Janssen, Ada Palmer, Andrea Phillips, Sabrina Vourvoulias, T.X. Watson.

Dystopia is popular in YA fiction for a variety of reasons, but why do authors frequently base their future dystopian society on some flimsy ideas, rather than using history to draw parallels between past atrocities and current human rights violations? Is it easier to work from one extreme idea, such as “love is now considered a disease” rather than looking at the complexities of, for example, the corruption of the U.S.S.R or the imperialism of the US? If science fiction uses the future to look at the present, is it more or less effective when using real examples from the past to look at our present through a lens of the future?

Friday, July 8, 6 PM:

Who Gets to Tell My Story?

Keffy Kehrli, Mikki Kendall (leader), Robert V. S. Redick, Elsa Sjunneson-Henry, Sabrina Vourvoulias.

Some calls for diverse submissions focus on the identity of the author, while others focus on the identity of the characters. What are the differences between the stories that result? Is there something problematic in a cis/het writer taking on a queer character’s story, or a white author with a protagonist who is a person of color? Does it depend on the story they are telling? Their skill telling it? Their awareness/avoidance of tropes? What responsibility do they have toward their protagonist’s community?

Saturday, July 9, 1 PM:

Upcoming

Reading

Sabrina Vourvoulias reads either “El Cantar de Rising Sun” scheduled for the July/August issue of Uncanny Magazine, or “Sin Embargo” which is included in Latino/a Rising (early 2017)

Latino/a Rising ToC announced

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The Latino/a Rising anthology, which will be released by  Wings Press in 2017, has made its table of contents known — and it is magnificent. I am so honored to have a short story included:

Foreword: Matthew David Goodwin

Introduction: Frederick Luis Aldama

Javier Hernandez: “El Muerto: Los Cosmos Azteca”

Kathleen Alcalá: “The Road to Nyer”

Pablo Brescia: “Code 51” (translated by Pablo Brescia with contributions by Matthew David Goodwin)

Pedro Zagitt: “Misinformed” and “Circular Photography” (translated by Nahir Otaño-Gracia)

Sabrina Vourvoulias: “Sin Embargo”

Daína Chaviano: “Accursed Lineage” (translated by Matthew David Goodwin)

ADÁL: Coconauts in Space

Ana Castillo: “Cowboy Medium”

Ernest Hogan: “Flying under the Radar with Paco and Los Freetails”

Junot Díaz: “Monstro”

Richie Narvaez: “Room for Rent”

Edmundo Paz-Soldán: “Artificial” (translated by Heather Cleary)

Steve Castro: “Two Unique Souls” and “Through the Right Ventricle”

Alex Hernandez: “Caridad”

Carmen Maria Machado: “Difficult at Parties”

Giannina Braschi: “Death of the Businessman” and “Burial of the Sardine”

Carlos Hernandez: “Entanglements”

Alejandra Sanchez: “The Drain”

Daniel José Older: “Red Feather and Bone”

Carl Marcum: “A Science Fiction” and “SciFi-ku”

Marcos Santiago Gonsalez: “Traditions”

A writing life: The best of what I’ve published in 2015

From fiction to long-form journalism to commentary, here are my personal favorites of the hundreds of thousands of words I’ve written this year:

Fiction

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The Ways of Walls and Words was published at Tor.com April 15, 2015, and has been selected for a Best of 2015 anthology. More on that as information becomes available.

 

Long-form journalism

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Why do I cast no shadow? Reaction and non-reaction to the police shootings of Latinos — AL DÍA News, May 27, 2015
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Across the Americas, indigenous peoples protest fossil fuel and mining incursions on native lands — AL DÍA News, May 31, 2015
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Devotion in masa The tamaleras of South Philly gear up for a savory sacramental season — AL DÍA News, Dec. 8, 2015
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Nelson Díaz: Not for sale Judge Nelson Díaz has long been engaged in defending civil rights in the public square. Most recently he made history as the first Latino candidate on the ballot of Philadelphia’s Democratic Mayoral primary — AL DÍA News, July 9, 2015
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For African Americans and Latinos in Philly, an unprecedented collaboration Using music and culture to challenge civic disenfranchisement and foster political participation in both communities — AL DÍA News, Oct. 27, 2015

 

Op-ed & commentary

at the Guardian

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Dec. 7, 2015 — Read it here

at Tor.com

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Feb. 2, 2015 — Read it here

at Following the Lede

 Revolutionaries in box braids, stilettos & layers of grunge: Older women in AHSCoven and the Walking Dead

at AL DÍA News

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Dec. 26, 2015 — Read it here
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Nov. 28, 2015 — Read it here
Enough with the voice over
March 24, 2015 — Read it here